Students Design and Build a Mobile Outreach, Education, and Design Center

Students Design and Build a Mobile Outreach, Education, and Design Center

Norwich University School of Architecture + Art students in Prof. Tolya Stonorov’s design studio are transforming a 21-foot 1969 Airstream Globetrotter into a mobile outreach, education, and design center. This unique American Institute of Architects, Vermont Chapter (AIAVT) project is made possible through a $42,750 grant from the AIA National Innovation Fund to create an “Archistream.”

Students are using a CNC machine to fabricate some of the components. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines are automated milling devices that make components using coded instructions that are sent to an internal computer, which allows parts to be made accurately. To see the CNC machine fabricate parts of the Archistream, watch the video.

Student Dan Wheeler, who is acting as Clerk of the Works, explains the design:

This mobile teaching device will serve to promote architecture in a rural state. A light canopy of tensioned canvas covers an outdoor sitting area and ramp, bringing the visitor up to the height of the entry. This creates a formal threshold and extends the space of the ARCHISTREAM to the community. The digitally fabricated waffle type construction, used throughout the design, is evidenced in the entry deck assembly. The deck uses breakdown, flat pack joinery, to enable stowage during travel.

The interior of the Airstream is programmatically conceived as three zones: a work + meeting zone, a resource + display zone, and a communal sitting zone. The plywood waffle construction allows for graceful changes in elevation; sitting, working and storage. The assembly method emphasizes a cohesive unit that is clearly a new construction inserted within an existing shell. The vertical ribs are a direct reference to the construction of the Airstream trailer and are representative of the new possibilities of digital fabrication. Wood and other warm tactile materials are introduced into the otherwise cool metallic nature of the existing shell. Local and sustainable material sources will be specified throughout, providing a connection to the local economy and a clear vision for a lasting and resilient Vermont.

Norwich University School of Architecture + Art students in Prof. Tolya Stonorov’s design studio are transforming a 21-foot 1969 Airstream Globetrotter into a mobile outreach, education, and design center. This unique American Institute of Architects, Vermont Chapter (AIAVT) project is made possible through a $42,750 grant from the AIA National Innovation Fund to create an “Archistream.” Students are using a CNC machine to fabricate some of the components. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines are automated milling devices that make components using coded instructions that are sent to an internal computer, which allows parts to be made accurately. To see the CNC machine fabricate parts of the Archistream, watch the video. Student Dan Wheeler, who is acting as Clerk of the Works, explains the design: This mobile teaching device will serve to promote architecture in a rural state. A light canopy of tensioned canvas covers an outdoor sitting area and ramp, bringing the visitor up to the height of the entry. This creates a formal threshold and extends the space of the ARCHISTREAM to the community. The digitally fabricated waffle type construction, used throughout the design, is evidenced in the entry deck assembly. The deck uses breakdown, flat pack joinery, to enable stowage during travel. The interior of the Airstream is programmatically conceived as three zones: a work + meeting zone, a resource + display zone, and a communal sitting zone. The plywood waffle construction allows for graceful changes in elevation; sitting, working and storage. The assembly method emphasizes a cohesive unit that is clearly a new construction inserted within an existing shell. The vertical ribs are a direct reference to the construction of the Airstream trailer and are representative of the new possibilities of digital fabrication. Wood and other warm tactile materials are introduced into the otherwise cool metallic nature of the existing shell. Local and sustainable material sources will be specified throughout, providing a connection to the local economy and a clear vision for a lasting and resilient Vermont.

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Norwich University School of Architecture + Art students in Prof. Tolya Stonorov’s design studio are transforming a 21-foot 1969 Airstream Globetrotter into a mobile outreach, education, and design center. This unique American Institute of Architects, Vermont Chapter (AIAVT) project is made possible through a $42,750 grant from the AIA National Innovation Fund to create an “Archistream.” Students are using a CNC machine to fabricate some of the components. Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machines are automated milling devices that make components using coded instructions that are sent to an internal computer, which allows parts to be made accurately. To see the CNC machine fabricate parts of the Archistream, watch the video. Student Dan Wheeler, who is acting as Clerk of the Works, explains the design: This mobile teaching device will serve to promote architecture in a rural state. A light canopy of tensioned canvas covers an outdoor sitting area and ramp, bringing the visitor up to the height of the entry. This creates a formal threshold and extends the space of the ARCHISTREAM to the community. The digitally fabricated waffle type construction, used throughout the design, is evidenced in the entry deck assembly. The deck uses breakdown, flat pack joinery, to enable stowage during travel. The interior of the Airstream is programmatically conceived as three zones: a work + meeting zone, a resource + display zone, and a communal sitting zone. The plywood waffle construction allows for graceful changes in elevation; sitting, working and storage. The assembly method emphasizes a cohesive unit that is clearly a new construction inserted within an existing shell. The vertical ribs are a direct reference to the construction of the Airstream trailer and are representative of the new possibilities of digital fabrication. Wood and other warm tactile materials are introduced into the otherwise cool metallic nature of the existing shell. Local and sustainable material sources will be specified throughout, providing a connection to the local economy and a clear vision for a lasting and resilient Vermont.

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