(re)surfacing: photography by Michael Hoffman, AIA (aka Studio X) on display at Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery

(re)surfacing: photography by Michael Hoffman, AIA (aka Studio X) on display at Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery

Keep your eyes on the Pocket Gallery at the entrance to Chaplin Hall.  Over the course of the next few weeks, it will showcase a rotating collection of photographs by Prof. Michael Hoffman.

The two photos that start us off give us a moment to pause and look a bit deeper at the buildings around us. “Woodsmoke” features Norwich University’s new biomass power plant smokestack. It was recorded in Nikon NEF format using a Nikon Df with a 70-300mm lens. Lightroom and Photoshop were used for adjustments and compositing. Prints were generated on an Epson R2400 using K3 archival inks.

“DAM Sunlight” captures a moment at the Extension to the Denver Art Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a building that was designed to respond to the extraordinary range of transformations in light, coloration, atmospheric effects, temperature and weather conditions within its unique city environment. It was recorded on an iPhone 5s using Pro HDR software,  adjusted in Lightroom and printed on the Epson R2400.

Hoffman says, “I took a break from serious photography a few years ago when Kodachrome Slide film went out of production and I did not wish to bankrupt my children’s college fund to purchase a professional full frame Nikon DSLR to use with my bag of lenses.  

With the recent release of the ‘reasonably priced’ Nikon Df and my children having finished university, I have the pleasure of immersing myself in the art again. While the new technology and processes are very familiar to the digital enthusiast, they are a departure from the way I thought and worked with a Kodachrome > Interneg > Cibachrome print flow. 

In a series of prints to be exhibited sequentially over the next few weeks, I’ll present work that explores a range of digital acquisition and manipulation tools. It is a new path, and one where the photographer is rewarded by rethinking the whole ‘visualization through exhibition’ process. 

Still, the goal of my efforts remains the same: a beautiful, engaging, and perhaps startling, image.”

Extension to the Denver Art Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a building that was designed to respond to the extraordinary range of transformations in light, coloration, atmospheric effects, temperature and weather conditions within its unique city environment.

Extension to the Denver Art Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a building that was designed to respond to the extraordinary range of transformations in light, coloration, atmospheric effects, temperature and weather conditions within its unique city environment.

 

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