Architecture Graduate Student Caitlyn Trepess’ “Happy Accidents” on Display at Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery

Architecture Graduate Student Caitlyn Trepess’ “Happy Accidents” on Display at Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery

    Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art presents “Happy Accidents,” an exhibit of original art works by architecture graduate student Caitlyn Trepess. Working with Prof. Lisa Kippen as part of an independent study in process, Trepess drew inspiration from artists such as Pat Steir and Agnes Martin.

Prof. Kippen says, “In a spirit of growing curiosity and awareness, Caitlyn Trepess quickly grasped the concepts of open-mindedness and even not-knowingness to accompany her explorations in process. The resulting drawings demonstrate to wonderful effect the value of using both planning and allowing. Indeed, the ‘turn toward art.’”

    The exhibit exemplifies the School’s mission and imparts the importance of the making of meaning and meaning of making.

Trepess says, “I was motivated to try new processes of making. Along the way I learned ways of getting lost in my work, and finding the good in what first seems bad. These happy accidents have taught me that beautiful pieces of art can come out of what seems like a catastrophe. Working with information from both artists’ processes and readings such as M.D. Eckel’s Lecture in Buddhism Part II, I was able to grow and explore the challenge of discovering new processes.”

    The exhibit includes only a small selection of the two-dimensional works Trepess completed during the semester and will be on display through December 19, 2014, in the Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery, located in the building’s main entrance.

Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art presents “Happy Accidents,” an exhibit of original art works by architecture graduate student Caitlyn Trepess. Working with Prof. Lisa Kippen as part of an independent study in process, Trepess drew inspiration from artists such as Pat Steir and Agnes Martin. Prof. Kippen says, “In a spirit of growing curiosity and awareness, Caitlyn Trepess quickly grasped the concepts of open-mindedness and even not-knowingness to accompany her explorations in process. The resulting drawings demonstrate to wonderful effect the value of using both planning and allowing. Indeed, the ‘turn toward art.’” The exhibit exemplifies the School’s mission and imparts the importance of the making of meaning and meaning of making. Trepess says, “I was motivated to try new processes of making. Along the way I learned ways of getting lost in my work, and finding the good in what first seems bad. These happy accidents have taught me that beautiful pieces of art can come out of what seems like a catastrophe. Working with information from both artists’ processes and readings such as M.D. Eckel’s Lecture in Buddhism Part II, I was able to grow and explore the challenge of discovering new processes.” The exhibit includes only a small selection of the two-dimensional works Trepess completed during the semester and will be on display through December 19, 2014, in the Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery, located in the building’s main entrance.

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Norwich University’s School of Architecture + Art presents “Happy Accidents,” an exhibit of original art works by architecture graduate student Caitlyn Trepess. Working with Prof. Lisa Kippen as part of an independent study in process, Trepess drew inspiration from artists such as Pat Steir and Agnes Martin. Prof. Kippen says, “In a spirit of growing curiosity and awareness, Caitlyn Trepess quickly grasped the concepts of open-mindedness and even not-knowingness to accompany her explorations in process. The resulting drawings demonstrate to wonderful effect the value of using both planning and allowing. Indeed, the ‘turn toward art.’” The exhibit exemplifies the School’s mission and imparts the importance of the making of meaning and meaning of making. Trepess says, “I was motivated to try new processes of making. Along the way I learned ways of getting lost in my work, and finding the good in what first seems bad. These happy accidents have taught me that beautiful pieces of art can come out of what seems like a catastrophe. Working with information from both artists’ processes and readings such as M.D. Eckel’s Lecture in Buddhism Part II, I was able to grow and explore the challenge of discovering new processes.” The exhibit includes only a small selection of the two-dimensional works Trepess completed during the semester and will be on display through December 19, 2014, in the Chaplin Hall Pocket Gallery, located in the building’s main entrance.

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